Tag: learning and development

3D Juggling 563: Active seeing

Claire writes: “The latest Coaching for Excellence course is underway.  One of the exercises on Day 1 is to listen without responding and to say what they heard and also what they saw.  So often we are listening whilst forming a question, a hypothesis or even a shopping list!

Coaching is about noticing not about diagnosing.  And learning to listen even more effectively is a key skill – in all aspects of life.  At the end of Day 1 we asked the delegates what they had learned.  One person referred to the listening  exercise: Active seeing is as important as active listening. Think about it…”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 562: Enough is Enough

Claire writes:  “When have you got enough information to be useful?  And when does being a learning junkie actually prevent you from applying what you do know?

I was running a training event on Saturday and, as commonly happens, the delegates wanted more and more data while I was asking them to try out what they knew already!  The real learning came once they started using it!

Enough is enough!  Too much knowledge can mean that we don’t know what to apply.  The greatest learning comes when we have enough to use and then can balance the application of skill and the aquisition of knowledge.  That’s what surgeons do. Thank goodness!

So next time you feel yourself becoming a learning junkie, consider the balance of aquisition and application – and when is enough enough.  Think about it…”

In what circumstances do people learn most of what they need to be effective?  Is it worth investing in training courses? If you manage a budget it would be useful to know the best way to invest in activity that will really make a difference. Lombardo and Eichinger’s 70/20/10 Model said that the odds are that development will be:

  • about 70% from on-the-job experiences, tasks, and problem solving (getting our hands dirty and dealing with things)
  • about 20% from feedback and from working around good or bad examples of the need (via conversations with more experienced people)
  • about 10% from courses and reading

So maybe courses aren’t a good investment?  We recognise that development typically begins with a realisation of a need and motivation to do something about it.  If you come on any of our courses you will be working on real issues that you want to resolve, and rehearsing real conversations that you need to have.  You will be applying what you discover and learn to real situations so that you can approach them with confidence.  Feedback from participants tells us that this approach works.

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 553: Talent Management and Strictly

Lynn writes: “I was watching Russell Grant and Flavia on Strictly Come Dancing and then on It Takes Two.  Russell had much enthusiasm and passion for dancing – and compared to some of the other more novelty contestants – he also had some talent, natural rhythm, energy and a degree of accuracy in his steps.

It struck me that there is some learning for talent management in organisations in how Flavia has been working with him.  Enthusiasm that is unchannelled and doesn’t develop skills and talents can actually be quite irritating. Trying to teach Russell to become like Flavia would be pointless.  Instead Flavia has been a role model, demonstrating with clarity new steps and choreography.  She is embracing Russell’s need to make the dance his own and they then co-create the final performance.  She is responsive to his pace and flow when she has put in rest points and he fills them with more content.  What you end up seeing is a humorous, fun and mutually respectful relationship which is developing the enthusiasm into a greater talent.

Where’s the learning from this in your organisation? Think about it…”

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 487: Data Junkies

Claire writes: ‘I have lost count of the number of times I have heard people talk about doing another course to get more confident or knowledgeable in a certain area. Last week I was speaking at a networking meeting where small business owners are keen to grow their networks. There I found a desire to grow networks.

Growing knowledge and networks are great ideas.  And they need to be asked within the context:

  • What have I done with the knowledge that I have already?
  • What have I done with the contacts I have already?

I suspect I am a learning junkie, too.  And looking at my desk now I am asking myself – what have I done with the books I’ve already bought!  With encouragement from colleagues I am taking 3 calendar years to complete my supervision training. So far I have learned one new concept each year and taken 12 months to integrate it into my practice.  That’s why Coaching for Excellence is popular in organisations because it helps managers and leaders work with colleagues to help them take time to think and to apply what they already know.

Putting knowledge or networks into action will grow your competency and confidence… and only then will you know: What next?’

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you?  You could send it to someone who is a learning junkie!

© 2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 475: The Art of Slowlyness 1

Claire writes: “I’ve been posting a few comments on Twitter about the art of slowlyness which have received some good feedback so I thought I would share them with you. Having spent six days at Spring Harvest where it was good to meet some of you, I have enjoyed sitting and mulling in the few days since I returned. Those trapped by volcanic ash seem to have taken two very different approaches to the chaos. Those with schedules and responsibilities have been desperately trying to find a way home. My parents did a 4 day rescue mission to the Spanish border to fetch my brother and his wife. Others who have less of a pressing agenda are sitting it out and enjoying a slower pace. I spoke to a colleague who thinks his Dad will be the last Brit home as he is enjoying the slow waiting pace so much!

Reflective thinkers seem to find it easy to make space in a busy schedule to think. Activists find it much more difficult because there is always something to be done. Different solutions fit different people, although I recognise in myself that my brand-new solution will only work for a season, although it will probably come back and be fit for purpose sometime in the future. I was reminded recently of an extrovert who wanted some thinking time. The thought of going on a quiet day or even a quiet hour was too much for him. Their solution was to take a few days out, and frequent the coffee shops of the nearby city. They were alone which gave them time to think, but in company and in the hustle and bustle of the city. It worked.

My thinking space is the Starbucks at our local motorway service station. I don’t meet anyone I know, I have my favourite seat and it gives me productive time to think. It doesn’t take long to download and get some clarity about what’s going on, what’s important, and what can be left.

Where do you practice the art of slowlyness?

We’d love to hear your ideas on this. Email info@3dcoaching.com to tell us how you practice the art of slowlyness.

Try it!

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who needs to slow down.

© 2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

 

3D Juggling 443: Take cover

Claire writes: ‘I’m back to work after 5 weeks off when Lynn and Jane have been covering all the goings on at 3D. When other people cover, it’s a great way of noticing whether or not your systems are working – does everyone know what they need to know? It’s also a good test of delegation. If you’ve just come back from holiday, is there anything that you don’t need to take back? And are there different ways you need to share information which will make things easier in the future?

Covering for others is also a great way of exploring whether or not there is appeal in a post like theirs, and a chance to stretch your skills into new areas which can really help your CV and future job applications. So if you’ve been covering for someone else, what can you do now that you couldn’t do before? Make sure you get that down on your CV.

Apart from relief, what do you need to remember from your experience of cover over the holiday period?’

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who needs to read it!
© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 393: A new discipline

Claire writes: “I have to confess to a slight obsession with the Olympics. I’m still mulling over whether that is connected with switching on the TV at breakfast and discovering that Great Britain have yet more gold medals! Or maybe it’s because it’s been raining! Who knows?

Anyway the TV has been background wallpaper in the mornings for the last couple of weeks. Interviewed about her 400m bronze in the hurdles, Tasha Danvers admitted to already decidingwhat new discipline she will add to her portfolio for 2012. Rebecca Romero added to her 2004 silver medal for rowing with a cycling gold. Interesting how different that is from the commonly given advice – concentrate on what you do well.

How different would things be for you and your organisation if you developed even one new skill? Pablo Picasso said: ‘I am always doing things I can’t do; that’s how I get to do them.’

Food for thought?”

Discuss this week’s juggling at http://www.3dcoaching.blogspot.com/
(c) 2008 3D Coaching Ltd

3D Juggling 387: Saving the Collective Story

Claire writes: “Last week, Jeremy talked about the power of stories. At a recent IOD Breakfast, Martin Bell spoke compellingly about the shift in the UK governments attitude to war since (at that time) no members of the cabinet have been in active service. He pointed out that the government has lost the collective story that is important in them making informed decisions on behalf of the country.

How do we retain the story? By retelling it and by experiencing it. The Jewish people retell the story through the sabbath meal. Christians retell the story through the eucharist. How do organisations retell the story?

Experiencing a story gives its own insights. I have never been truly poor, but having lived amongst the poor in a rural African village, my understanding of the issues facing the poor has been changed forever. I carry their story with me. Tesco require their managers to work on the shop floor from time to time to experience the stories of both customers and the workers on the shop floor.

The collective story is important. How do you keep it alive as it develops into the future – in your work and in your family?”

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to your colleagues.

(c) 2008 3D Coaching Ltd