Tag: meetings

3D Juggling 572: Finding Time

Jane writes: ‘How often do you say, or hear others say, that there just isn’t enough time to do everything that needs to be done?  Recent research suggests that time wasted at meetings could equate to 13 million hours a week.  Just think about how that time could be used more effectively?  Maybe more effective meetings, and less of them, would help.

We encourage clients to think about these questions:

  • What is the meeting for?  What are the required outcomes? Does everyone know this?
  • Who really needs to be there? Why?
  • What needs to be clear as the meeting starts?
  • How is unhelpful behaviour managed?
  • What is important as a meeting closes?

And there are more.  We run effective meetings (and train others to run them) using the CLEAR model.  Ask us how we do it.’

© 2012 3D Coaching LtdMay be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

Recent research from Epson and the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) found that one in five senior managers and directors spend over 10 hours a week in meetings.  Our experience is that this is an underestimate.  We agree with Daniel Solomon of CBR who says “It is vital that UK businesses address their policies on meetings and consider ways that these could be more effective”.

3D Juggling 549: Hot Seat

Claire writes: ‘I was running a ‘Brilliant Chairing’ course last week and was talking about why chairing a meeting can feel like being in the hot seat. How much do we make it hot? And how much do others make it feel hot for us?

Whose responsibility is it to make sure a meeting is effective? The chair has an important role in that, and the responsibility is held by everyone. Isn’t it? Think about it…’

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 545: The Banks of the Yangtze

Claire writes: “I would be a millionaire if I was paid £1 for every time I have used this Chinese proverb in training. I learned it as a child:

The Banks of the Yangtze give it depth, drive and direction

  • Unless we make a clear agreement about the boundaries of a conversation, it may lack depth, drive and direction
  • Unless we are clear what a meeting is for, it may lack depth, drive and direction
  • Maybe we can do anything, but unless we have depth, drive and direction, we may not get there!

Think about it…”

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 476: That House

Su writes: “There’s a regular journey I take with my children. Have done it many, many times. It’s a journey that is all about getting to the destination – we’re not in it to look at the scenery. So many times, I’m on automatic and we travel along discussing school, favourite colours and what would happen if you really did have eyes in the back of your head.

Once recently, in the middle of this train of scintillating conversation, we were interrupted by one of the children: “I know we’re going the right way”, she said, “because we always pass that house”.

“That house” was very inconsequential: a bland, beige, functional box of a house which did not demand or desire any attention. I can honestly say I have never properly looked at that house before, although I have gone past it so many times over so many years. And every journey since then, I have noticed the house. I now know the colour of the curtains, I notice when the hedge has been cut and I wonder about the inhabitants. Something which was very part of the background has been pulled into the foreground, by a chance comment that was made.

In our standard work activities, we often have to go through the process: enter into the same room with the same people for the same regular meeting. As we’re on autopilot, we are not aware of how we’re going about doing this: it could well be that we’re continuously making the same mistakes or not identifying the things we’re good at. At the next meeting you’re at, why don’t you bring some of this into the foreground? Make your team aware of what’s happening at the side of the conversation, on the parameters of the journey. Without judgement or agenda: “Lisa is being talked over”; “we avoid discussing the figures”; “our action planning makes all the difference”.

It’s important that our meetings are focussed on achieving their outcomes efficiently. By noticing what is happening along the way, we give ourselves the opportunity to understand, reflect on and even enjoy the process of getting there.

Have a look around for “that house””

Discuss this week’s juggling at http://www.3dcoaching.blogspot.com/

© 2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 418: Kick the Cat

Claire writes: ‘How many times have you come out of a meeting and wanted to kick the cat? Or gone to the water cooler with a friend and said “$£&%£$*&*%%&£$% That ALWAYS happens…” Even organisations and groups that are involved in learning rarely reflect on how they work together because we are so caught up in what we are working on. And when reflection does happen, it’s because there has been a problem and something needs to be done.

What will be possible if, at the end of every meeting – even board meetings – the members take 5-10 minutes to notice what went well about how we worked together? And is there anything we need to do differently? Even better – imagine what it will then be like when people leave a meeting with a new insight which they haven’t had before?’

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who gets frustrated by meetings!

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 412: WAIT

Claire writes: “One of my supervisees arrived the other day with a piece of paper which he takes to training events. It says WAIT. Why Am I Talking? What a great tool to have in front of you in a group or a committee!

When she is having a conversation, Nancy Kline, asks people to indicate when they have done all their thinking lest she interrupt their silence before they are ready to move on.”

“Don’t talk unless you can improve the silence.” Jorge Luis Borges

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 407: Extravagant Thinking

Claire writes: ‘The Maths teacher in me loves to listen to people deciding whether to go for the lowest common denominator decision or the highest common factor. Too often in organisations when a group decision is needed, we end up with something nearer the lowest common denominator which doesn’t necessarily mean the best decision. Put 6 people together and it would be lovely to see them thinking with more than 600% of the thinking of one person. What makes it feel like 60%, I wonder?

At the moment the pressure of meeting costs and deadlines at work can make staff feel under even more pressure to make quick and consensual decisions. And thinking extravangantly of the very best possible solution doesn’t necessarily mean more money. So in the next few decisions you need to make, see what ideas you get when you think extravagantly!

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to a numerate friend or colleague.’

(c) 2008 3D Coaching Ltd

Precis

Love this quote sent by Mark Greene in response to the comments about precis

Franklin D Roosevelt said: Be sincere; be brief; be seated.