Tag: slowlyness

3D Juggling 472: Digital Danger?

Jeremy writes: “I saw a chilling powerpoint slide at a well-respected business school yesterday. Divided into four quarters, it displayed the 20 or 25 different types of communication technology available in modern life and business today and allocated them to quartiles according to their suitability for various functional requirements.

All the things we use were there (emails, mobiles, texts, social networking, tele-conferencing etc), plus several I had never heard of! There were many additional web-based ones, some only appropriate to international corporate life. It made an impressive, colourful and complex display which took several minutes to absorb!

So why was it chilling? Because the simplest and most direct communication medium was nowhere on the slide. The possibility of a face to face conversation was absent. Even the “resolution of conflict” section didn’t include it.

You might argue that it was obviously meant to be assumed as an alternative… and that then becomes an issue we must face. The danger nowadays is that we categorise a personal conversation as a luxury, the medium of last resort and not the first.

The original slide was about making good choices of technology, and that is fine. However, there is a “use it or lose it” dimension to replacing simple, straight conversations with electronic alternatives. If we choose, through cultural or peer pressure, or convenience, or even fear, to habitually choose to exchange digital messages rather than facing people to both listen and talk, it could all become very addictive, and the choice element might oh-so-gradually disappear!

If there are really important conversations you need to have, or difficult messages you need to pass to the real people with whom you live and work, don’t rule out the face to face option without careful consideration.

If you lack confidence in this arena, why not talk to 3D about Coaching for Excellence or other appropriate and helpful interventions?

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who is totally techie.

2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 458: Waste Time Well

Claire writes: ‘Most of us will have time off over Christmas. After all the preparations and the rush to clear your work before the holiday, how will you spend your time? Are you scheduled out with family commitments or shifts to cover? Or do you have time to choose? Our Christmas present to you is to ask you to spend some time doing nothing well. It’s easy to spend all holiday thinking: ‘In a minute I ought to…’, to potter and then to end up unsure of what we’ve done with a sense of having achieved nothing.

Consider the question: If I was to waste time today and feel great about it afterwards, what would I do? It may be choosing to potter and to have no sense of guilt. It may be to choose to spend all day in your pyjamas or to watch back to back Christmas films. Or to sit and stare at a view or read a book.

Whether you choose to waste an hour, a day or even a week, what will you do to waste time well?

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who needs permission to waste time.

Discuss this week’s juggling at http://www.3dcoaching.blogspot.com/

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

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3D Juggling 388: Long Grass

Claire writes: “We ran the Race For Life in the rain. I finished in 31 minutes 39 seconds. A personal best (by nearly 6 minutes). My friend kept reminding me that I recently wrote that it’s good not to run too early, so I didn’t! We ran on Jesus Green in Cambridge and the middle of the race was through what can only be described as a meadow. Like most people, I walked this part.

After avoiding rabbit holes and getting wet trainers in the long grass, coming back to short grass was a gift and each of us had a much faster finish as a result. Slowing down meant that we enjoyed the finish, and I am even committed now to working towards a 10km run. If I had run flat out the whole way, I would have collapsed and lost motivation.

I am wondering whether that is true at work? And in education. Did you ever slog to the end of exams and promise: ‘Never again?’ It’s OK to slow down and walk through the long grass of a project as it may well give you a better finish and motivation to start another!

Although I’m still not convinced the clock was right! But we celebrated anyway!

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to your running friends!

(c) 2008 3D Coaching Ltd