Category: ICF 11 Managing Progress and Accountability

3D Ideas 815: Three Days

Claire writes: “Sam emailed round the team last week to share that in order to support people to embed their learning, she was asking them to reflect and practice more after they have left the training room. She asks people to complete a reflective log to bring back to the next day of training. Knowing how difficult some us find it to deliver on good intentions, we tried it this week with a different group. We invited them to ask two questions at the end of each day for the next three days only:

  • Where have I applied what I am learning?
  • Where didn’t I use it where I might have?

Whether it’s after training, having coaching or even reading a great book, I wonder what new insights we might gain if we did that for three days?”

© 2018 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Ideas 782: Forgetting Curve

Claire writes: “At a recent team meeting, Su introduced us to Ebbinghaus’s Forgetting Curve from the late 1800s. His hypothesis was that we need to repeat what we are learning in order to remember it (I’d like to add and therefore to apply it).

This makes sense of our intuitive training style where we ask people

  • What are we learning?
  • What do you know now that you didn’t know before?

It’s also why we are beginning to introduce refresher modules – to renew energy and insight and to encourage people to apply new ways of having conversations. There will be more of these in 2018 because they work!”

© 2017 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Ideas 748: A to Z

letters-691842_1280Claire writes: “On Wednesday we will close the office for 2 weeks.  It’s a chance to stop, reset, and re-engage with the other parts of our lives.  It is a huge privilege to have met and worked with so many people this year and we have learned from everyone in different ways.


A favourite Pedrick family activity will be our annual A to Z where we write a word or a phrase that sums up our last 12 months.  We’re not great journalers, but an hour can bring back and record highlights and sometimes low lights worth remembering.


We look forward to catching up with you in 2017.  Meanwhile, a very Happy Christmas from all of us at 3D Coaching.”


© 2016 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com  Register here to receive our blog posts every Monday by email  Register here to receive our blog posts every Monday by email

3D Ideas 722: Finishing Off

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Claire writes: “Acronyms help remember things. A group in Leicester challenged themselves to work out how to make a good ending to a conversation. They came up with CALF:

  • Check/ challenge the contract
  • Accountability – when/ what needs to happen to get this done?
  • What have you Learned so far?
  • Have we Finished?

That final question is interesting. Notice where the responsibility sits when you say ‘Have we finished?’ rather than ‘I think we have finished’. It’s useful.

David Clutterbuck’s Four Is are also a useful end to a conversation – especially if notes need to be made together:

  • What are the issues we have discussed?
  • What insights have you had?
  • What ideas have we come up with?
  • What are your intentions?

After all, a great end is as important as a great beginning.”
© 2016 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 672: Micro Movement

Claire writes: ‘Amabile and Kramer‘s research into progress isn’t startling: Any progress is progress.  Perhaps it is startling, though, because it helps us to see that even a tiny movement in a conversation can move someone forward.

Which means that ending a conversation with a question like: ‘What do you know now that you didn’t know at the beginning of our conversation‘ can usefully name that progress has, in fact, been made.’

© 2015 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 666: Mind your language!

Happy New Year from everyone at 3D Coaching

Claire writes: “Supportiveness comes in all shapes and sizes: ‘What are you going to do about it, then?’ may not rank in your top ten for support. And ‘What do you want (would you like) me to do about it?’ whether said or implied can often be what we say when we end up taking responsibility for things that really belong to someone else.

In any conversation, there are three areas of responsibility – yours, mine and what we do together in this conversation (and possibly beyond, depending on our roles). A coaching approach encourages us to be clear about language:

What can WE do in this conversation so that YOU are clear enough about a way forward?

Careful use of we for what’s happening here and now in the process of this conversation, and you for action keeps responsibility where it needs to be. If you’re in a leader, manager or supervisor role and it’s not all down to your colleague taking action, you can always end with ‘Is there anything that I need to do as a result of this conversation?’

People who use this say they sleep better at night!

Principle 10: You action – we process

© 2015 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 664: When It’s Over

In the new year we will be starting some Group Mentoring sessions through webinars for people who have had some training in coaching and want to refine and develop skills and possibly move towards accreditation. One group will be low cost and specifically aimed at clergy. Call the office if you’re interested.

Claire writes: ‘Parkinson’s Law that ‘work expands to fill the time available for its completion‘ can certainly be true in one to one conversations. Whether giving or receiving there is a risk that we will try and carry them on longer than is necessary – either by continuing the conversation when we have done what we need to do, or by continuing to meet over time when the encounter has served it’s purpose. It’s tricky as it’s not uncommon to get to know people well enough that spending time together is enjoyable. If that’s the case, promote them to being a coffee or a lunch companion. In coaching, when it’s over it’s over. Not a great business model for independent coaches, but it’s the right thing to do!

Except, of course, when it isn’t! It ain’t over till the fat lady sings – so sometimes we need to raise the challenge at the end – ‘Do you know how you are going to do that?’ can move an intention to an action. Some people use a coaching style conversation as an external thinking partner over time – and those are relationships that will last longer than engagements to work around a specific theme.

Principle 8: When it’s over it’s over’

© 2014 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 656: Coaching is simple – simple isn’t easy

Claire writes: ‘Nicky and I had a great day over the summer cutting back the materials we use on our courses to make them even more simple.  We are now teaching about 20% of what we taught ten years ago.  And people are getting more skilled more quickly.

We think there are just 15 principles to making a conversation (coaching or not) effective.  So we’ll have a look at them over the next few weeks.  None of them are rocket science as you will see!

3D’s Coaching Principles

1.    Contract for time as well as subject
2.    Talk to the person not the problem – right here right now
3.    Change hats with consent
4.    Be silent and ask questions where necessary
5.    Stand in a different place
6.    Name it – Say what you see without judgement
7.    Do it now: Real play
8.    When it’s over, it’s over
9.    Show the working out
10.    You action – we process
11.    Match for rapport – mismatch for change
12.    Name it
13.    Keep the responsibility in the middle
14.    Keep out of the way
15.    Ask them

That’s it!’

© 2014 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 595: Takeaways

Claire writes: “Wrapping up a meeting to check on who will be doing what is vital.  Who wraps up after a one to one?  Managers often summarise for their colleague.  Coaches often say the equivalent of ‘What did I do today that worked or didn’t work for you?’.

David Clutterbuck wraps up sessions with his 4Is

  • Issues discussed
  • Ideas created
  • Insights had
  • Intentions made

Might that be a useful takeaway in one to ones or meetings where you are?  Think about it…?”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 581: Holding to account

Marion Foreman  is our guest coach again this week

Marion writes” I was talking to a client recently and her parting comment was ‘thank you for holding me to account’.  I was particularly pleased to hear this as I had spent much time explaining, encouraging the client to hold herself accountable – that the accountability didn’t lie with me.

So often it is only too easy to take responsibility for others’ issues, to provide a solution and accept their (unvoiced offer) to make them accountable to us.  How many times do you hear ‘sorry to let you down’?    How crestfallen do they look when you gently explain that they haven’t let us down at all, the person that they have let down is themselves.

Once someone has a goal, the easiest next step is to ask them what they need to do to get there and what they need to do in the week ahead to be where they want to be.  And at the end of the week?  If they don’t make it completely, ask what happened and what are they going to do differently in the week ahead.

The feedback from my clients is that the thought of talking to me and explaining their decision makes them think more than once about what they are about to do.  Until the accountability is firmly embedded – this works as a strategy.   What are you going to hold yourself accountable for this week?  Think about it.”
© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
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