Tag: purpose

3D Juggling 629: Inside Out

Claire writes: “‘Life has an inside as well as an outside’ was something Jeanette Winterson said in her Radio 4 discussion with the late John Taverner and others last week.

Something to ponder in the workplace?”

© 2013 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

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3D Juggling 617: Why why is useful sometimes

Last week we said goodbye to Liz Ford one of our team of coaches.  Thanks, Liz, for all that you brought to the team.  We wish you well in the future.

Claire writes: “I have never been a great fan of the question why, because often people can’t answer a question about why they want a job, or did something.  But as Simon Sinek points out in this TED Video, when people know why they do what they do and understand enough about their purpose, it makes all the difference.

“People don’t buy what you do; people buy why you do it.”, he says and that’s why “Martin Luther King gave the ‘I have a dream’ speech, not the ‘I have a plan’ speech.”

If you look at it like that, I love why!

© 2013 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

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3D Juggling 489: Jam

Claire writes: “I was having Greek Salad for lunch during one of our courses when a delegate asked me: So is your work thick jam or thin jam?

We began to talk and it helped me to really understand that our purpose is to meet people for a short period of time and then for them to begin to engage differently with their work or career.  Thin jam.

I’m not keen on reusing questions but it has proved to be useful in many different contexts.  I recently asked a Board of Trustees the jam question about their operational work.  It’s a great career change question when people are considering whether they wish to have a deep impact with a small group of people or a wider impact with a larger group.  And if your organisation is restructuring it’s a great question to reclarify your purpose within the organisation.

So what’s your purpose: Thick jam or thin jam?”

© 2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 440: Destinations

Claire writes: ‘On our holiday last week with only 20m visibility in the Dorset fog, we had to hold on to the hope that we would end up in Dorchester. And we did! I had been reading ‘Woman on the Edge of a Nervous Breakdown’ a hysterical novel by Guardian journalist Lorna Martin. The lead character says “If you don’t have a destination, you can never fail to get there, but you will end up drifting along forever.”

Look around, and those who know what they are working for tend to be much happier and more fulfilled at work than those who don’t. Purpose is really important. In his book ‘Path to Purpose‘, academic Patrick Damon’s research supports this. He expands to say that purpose also needs to include other people. Which is what Aristotle said all along: where your talents and the needs of the world collide, there lies your vocation.

Where is yours? Or are you still in the fog?

If you would like to talk to someone to help explore what your purpose might be, do email us info@3dcoaching.com

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who is looking for a purpose.

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 384: Meaning

Claire writes: ‘The Work Foundation’s report ‘Inwardness: The Rise of Meaningful Work’ connects with a recent survey which suggested that 70% of employees want fulfillment at work. The challenge is that employers can’t impose meaning and purpose on their employees. Workers will find it on their own, or not. We call it vocation, whether or not someone has a faith.

Aristotle said: ‘Where your talents and the needs of the world collide, there lies your vocation.’ I would expand that by saying that talents are what we are both good at and passionate about.
I spoke to a man last week who was uncertain about future directions. Mid conversation we stopped and I asked: “What will be different if you REALLY know that this workplace is where you are meant to be.” ‘Everything’, he answered. Everything has changed in him. Nothing has changed at work.

Meaning and purpose certainly don’t have to come from faith, but continuing lastw eek’s theme, one of the benefits of valuing faith in the workplace is that people who do have faith will have a priority to serve their employer and to serve God. Hopefully that brings a foundation of purpose. I recently heard a nurse talk about difficulties in a hospital where many staff are disillusioned and wanting to leave. ‘I believe God wants me to do this job. I’m not leaving’ she said. Employers can’t impose meaning and purpose. This nurse has found it for herself.

Do you feel fulfilled at work? And do you create an environment which allows others to find meaning and purpose in what they do?’

PS This connects interestingly with some research on the world in 2018 conducted by the Chartered Institute of Managers.

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to your last boss.

(c) 2008 3D Coaching Ltd