Tag: learning and development

3D Juggling 682: Using coaching at work

Claire writes: ‘The best and simplest learning from coaching has a contribution to make to conversations at work – sharing responsibility develops confidence in staff; creative silence gives space for thinking and helps people come up with their own solutions; contracting helps start conversations well and enables them to be more productive; noticing what you see (without judging) allows for significantly more challenge than diagnosing. We are collecting short 1-2 minute videos with people’s best examples of using coaching at work – to share through the website. So if you have an example and a smart phone we’d love to hear from you.

At last year’s Coaching at Work conference, the University of Sydney’s Tony Grant observed how coaching has developed at work:

  • Generation one was performance management conversations without the litigation!
  • Generation two brought overly mechanical approaches which tried to fit a professional coaching model into the workplace
  • Generation three is less about tools and techniques and more about internalising coaching principles to enable staff to develop and flourish in the workplace – which benefits the organisation as well

It’s all about the quality of our conversations. Talk to us if you would like to develop more effective conversations in your workplace.

© 2015 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com Subscribe to 3D Juggling

 

3D Juggling 679: Are you an imposter?

Claire writes: “A colleague in Leadership Development was telling me about some research on why senior leaders can sometimes be reluctant to engage in training and development. Most of us suffer from imposter syndrome – that fear that someone will find out that we don’t know everything about what we are doing. It appears that there is a feeling that if we engage in further training and development, it will just confirm that we are not entirely competent in what we do, so we don’t go. Interesting when vulnerability is an important leadership quality.

A couple of days later someone else talked about whether it is possible to be formed as a leader from the first chair? In the second chair, we can safely receive feedback and development and not knowing is a great quality. In some sectors that formation of leaders happens over many years. It is an interesting question for people in the church, for example, where most people start their post of first responsibility in a place where there is little or no first hand feedback from peers.

Reflection, making mistakes, learning from them and not knowing all the answers makes great leaders. So being an imposter may not be such a bad thing. After all, who wants to work with or for someone who believes they know absolutely everything?!

© 2015 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com Register here to receive our blog posts every Monday by email

 

3D Juggling 648: Getting Practical

Claire writes: “Daughter #2 has passed her driving theory test.  The next step is to up the practice for the practical.  She won’t be turning her head to the back seat to check the Highway Code mid lesson, although she may refer to the theory from time to time.

McCall, Lombardo and Eichinger’s surveyed high-performing managers (The Career Architect Development Planner, 1996) revealing that:

“Lessons learned by successful and effective managers are roughly:

  • 70% from tough jobs
  • 20% from people (mostly the boss)
  • 10% from courses and reading”

Which affirms the value of mentoring and taking time to reflect on practical learning.”

© 2014 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com
Subscribe to 3D Juggling

3D Juggling 628: Bicycles and Gutters

Claire writes: “I had a great chat with a cyclist this week who was telling me that the safest place to cycle is to be a third of the way from the kerb.  That way, he said, people treat you like a vehicle and know how to overtake safely and respectfully (mostly!).  They instinctively know how to put in good boundaries with you.  When you cycle close to the edge, you’re more likely to fall into the gutter, and they are less likely to honour safe space around the bike and to drive too close.

We were wondering whether that’s replicated in other kinds of boundaries.  When you set your own well enough, other people know how to navigate and respect them (on the whole).  It’s food for thought.”

© 2013 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com


Subscribe to 3D Juggling

3D Juggling 597: Coffee – real or instant?

Happy New Year! We hope that you had a good break. We are delighted to announce our new line up for 2013. Alan Gyle and Nicola McGinty will be joining the 3D team.  Both have extensive experience working with groups and team and individuals.  This is also a chance to say thank you to Nadia Evans who is now living in Dubai, and Liz Ford who will be leaving before Easter.  It’s been great to have them both as part of our journey.

Claire writes: “I have switched off so completely over the Christmas break that it’s taking focus to reengage – and I thought I had nothing to say. But inspiration came over the expresso maker! As a coffee snob, I like the real stuff and love the way you pack the expresso maker and then leave it to do its work.

Sometimes in conversations, I notice, we hope for great results while we are in dialogue with the other person.  On occasions real results come much later – perhaps days or even months – and are of a greater depth and quality than those that come in the moment.  Here’s an email we received just before Christmas from someone we worked with a couple of years ago: “…one of the things it made me really understand is just how long learning can go on for – even after the actual ‘learning’experience. A lot of the things we talked about when we were working together made a certain kind of sense at the time, but they’ve come to make even more sense in the [time since]… I’ve been able to make a different kind of sense of them”

Real coffee takes time to brew.  Not all learning is instant!  Think about it…”

© 2013 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 593: To care and not to care

Claire writes: “When you’re working with people and real stuff, it’s hard to not become involved in some of the pain and confusion that we hear.  That’s true in coaching and it’s also probably true in much of what you do day to day.  Trust and intimacy are an important aspect of a coaching approach.  Yet the risk is that we enter so far into the pain and confusion that we lose our ability to support that individual or organisation because we become as stuck as our companion.

TS Elliot has some wisdom here: “Teach us to care and not to care. Teach us to sit still.”

I don’t think that sitting still is necessarily about being passive. Maybe it’s one way of supporting others to hold their nerve through difficult times – and holding it ourselves.  Think about it…?”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 586: Knowledge Junkies

Claire writes: “This week has held all kinds of connections and crossovers.  On Monday I was staying in a Premier Inn in Nottingham and preparing for an event talking to parents about employabilty.  The customer service was brilliant.  Often I feel as though I am listening to a recorded message when I check in to a hotel, but the service there was outstanding – including us being given a breakfast for free because ‘you didn’t have much’. They had absorbed the rules and applied them with humanity. That’s one of the skills employers are looking for in new recruits out of school or university

That emotionally intelligent customer service reminded me of the Jung quotation I had heard that morning in a conversation about coaching: “Learn your theories as well as you can, but put them aside when you touch the miracle of the living soul“. That’s what we wrote on the flip chart for the coaching skills training the next day as we encouraged our delegates to trust themselves and the process.

Where do you need to learn theories?  And where does the learning junkie in you need to trust the process? Think about it…”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 580: Grids and Triangles

Claire writes: “Jane was joking the other day that if a diagram isn’t a grid, a triangle or a Venn diagram, we won’t use it!  I’ve just been reading Visual Meetings by David Sibbert who talks about using graphics more effectively.

One idea of his really connected with a recent email I received when someone said they were going into a new job and did we have any tips for the first few months?

David Sibbert has a grid for you.  Four squares:  Impact (high and low) and Effort (easier and harder)

Draw it – where would you start?  Think about it…”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 567: Stop reading books!

Claire writes: ‘I met someone last week who is interested in developing coaching skills and has done a big amazon shop to help develop their skillset.  They are somewhat confused. The same can be true when developing other skills.  And there lies the problem of reading too many books…

It’s rather like reading the highway codes of every nation.  One says – there is no code.  Another – drive on the left. Drive on the right. Give priority to cars coming from the right. Drive to win!  The only way to learn to drive is to do it.  In the car.  And to have an instructor who can help you learn and give you feedback against what is agreed to be good and safe driving in that country.

I am fascinated that billions of pounds are spent on training people to use technical skills and hardly anything is spent on helping them learn to communicate with others – and receive feedback in a safe environment.  If you want to refine any kind of skill, there is a time when you need to stop reading books and start practicing – with feedback.  Think about it…’

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.comed to the listening  exercise: Active seeing is as important as active listening. Think about it…”

Positive Deviance

Su writes: I’ve been caught up in an interesting book: “The Power of Positive Deviance” by Pascale, Sternin and Sternin. Positive deviants, as outlined in the book, are those people who are working and living in the same set of circumstances and constraints as the rest of us, but that manage to succeed where others don’t. Immediately, possible scenarios spring to mind where this thinking might be applicable. This whole workforce is working under the posible threat of redundancy: how do some individuals still manage to be productive while others aren’t? All churches face similar constraints in terms of resources, time and money: how are some flourishing while others struggle? The key examples described in this book are about serious healthcare problems: malnutrition in children in Vietnam, female circumcision in Egypt. Rather than going in as the hero of the hour with education programmes and pamphlets, the authors instead worked with the communities in order to support them seeing who was doing things differently, how they were doing it and  allowing the community  to take responsibility for enacting these practices .

It sounds simple. But it isn’t done enough in organisations. The “top” feels the need to identify problems and find solutions, investing money in whizzy ways of communicating these. But actually devolving this responsibility to those actually doing the jobs is more effective. Scary, possibly, for those at the “top” who would like to control things, but far more effective in identifying the need for change and really making it happen. Do you remember the “our people are our greatest asset” mantra that companies used as a strap line in the nineties? Well I think this consideration of positve deviance may well be a way of making that aspiration live.

I wonder how it would in your organisation?