Tag: different perspective

3D Juggling 699: Masks

Alan writes: “Since 2013, Steve Wintercroft2015-10-05 17.02.24  and his wife have been designing polygonal DIY mask kits for home assembly. Human faces. Animals. Weird and wonderful creatures. All are available. The trick is simply this: you go online and order the mask you want; you pay online (£4.50 each) and download the template; then you find some scrap cardboard, some tape and glue and a ruler and craft knife – and the world of dressing-up is, as they say, your oyster!

Next week I am working again with a leadership team. We’ve come a long way in the past year in terms of thinking about strategy, behaviours, individual styles and team alignment. It hasn’t always been easy, but in truth, comparing where they were to where they are is like comparing night and day. One thing remains. Mask-removal.

We all wear masks. Not of the cardboard variety. I mean, we all go through life in our families, in our communities, our churches and in our workplaces either hiding behind a front we put on – or, just as frequently, putting on a front (or a mask) as a piece of combative strategy. We are seldom, truly, ourselves.

My team has moved a long way. The next step is the really big one. Can they now, having worked out what they’re meant to be doing, and having established a good deal of trust, risk removing their ‘masks’ and being themselves. For some this will mean being bolder; for others, it will mean risking being vulnerable. For all of them, it is – I suspect – the step that will move them from being ‘effective’ to being ‘transformative’ and ‘high-performing’. We are only truly transformative when we are ourselves, masks off.

What mask do you wear? What, I wonder, would it take for you to remove it?”

© 2015 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 661: Get Some Perspective

Claire writes: ‘Often people who want to have a conversation with us are a bit stuck with something.  If we ask questions about the something that keep them in the story, they will often stay stuck.

It makes a huge difference to perspective when we ask questions from a different place.  For example:

  • if someone is talking all about feelings ask a question about facts
  • if someone is talking all about their own view, ask what someone from their group or team – or the wider community might say or ask if they were here?

It’s amazing how effective that is at helping get unstuck.

Principle 5: Ask questions from a different place’

© 2014 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 641: Divergent

Claire writes: “One of my committments for 2014 has been to dip out of work early to watch a Friday Matinee with my daughter.

Friday’s film choice was Noah or Divergent.  Having no desire to see Noah, we went into Divergent with absolutely no idea what it was about.  It’s a great film – and the first in a trilogy.  It has much to teach us about the world of diagnostics and labels.  In this world, people live in factions which can easily align with many communications-style profiles.  Amity are kind and peaceful.  Abnegation are selfless servers, Candor value honesty, Dauntless are the protectors and Erudite are smart and logical. There is no room in this world for people who are more than monochrome in the way they engage, and people live in Factions.  They choose at 16 in a ceremony resembling Harry Potter’s Sorting Hats, and there is no capacity to change or develop. Those who don’t fit – or fit in more than one faction are called Divergents.

In that dead time before the film started, I was mulling over a comment someone had just made on a residential: “Is it OK to be an introvert?”. Organisations and society need people who can change and develop and work with others who are different from them, and we need to ensure that our working practices support that.  Yes, of course it is OK to be an introvert.  And residential programmes  need to have space for introverts to flourish, contribute and recover.  Healthy organisations need divergent people not factions.”

© 2014 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 635: Beyond Conversation

Listen to Claire talking about coaching at work 23 January 2014 8 AM Pacific / 11 AM Eastern / 4pm UK time on BlogTalk Radio

Claire writes: “Sometimes we can use a lot of words to explain something. Sometimes an insight from a song or an image or a poem can do that much more significantly.

TS Eliot’s Four Quartets are a case in point and were broadcast in Saturday Drama on Radio 4 It’s worth a listen. If you’ve missed the iPlayer window, the text is here.

What poetry or images are transformational for you? Please share on the blog.”

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3D Juggling 603: Busy busy

There are still spaces on the Masterclass on 25th Feb on helping people look at their situation from a different perspective; and on the next open Coaching for Excellence starting on 4th March.

Claire writes: “It’s Lent.  And there’s talk of who has given up what, and who isn’t interested.

The people at ‘I’m not busy’ are encouraging us to give up busyness for Lent.  It’s a bit like the art of slowlyness.

Even if that’s for 15 minutes out of your working day, it’s a great idea.”

© 2013 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 594: Looking round the corner

Welcome to all our new subscribers – and thanks to our reader who pointed out last weeks misspelling of TS Eliot, for which we apologise.

Claire writes: A delegate on a recent Coaching for Excellence told us that her husband has a job that takes him all over the world.  Every time he drives out of an airport in a hire car, he stops and looks back so that he will be able to know where he is when the airport becomes his destination later in the week.  A colleague asked a Programme Director what was keeping him awake at night, and he replied ‘Are we looking round the corners enough?’

As we navigate change and encounter new or similar situations, we look carefully and we see what we see and think that’s enough. Is it?  Or do we focus too narrowly? What would looking back or looking round the corners be like for you, at work? Think about it…?”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 584: Enough

Claire writes: ‘When I listen to people, I notice that they often have very specific goals – “I want a job that gives me satisfaction”  “I want to do a piece of work that’s good”, “I want to make a decision that feels safe”.  Somehere in there, I notice, is an assumption that this goal will be very satisfying or good or safe.  And often that stops people from starting.

Try changing the question. What’s satisfying enough? What’s safe enough? What’s good enough?

That little word can change our perception… and open up a real possibility of getting there. Where do you need to ask a question about enough? Think about it…’

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 579: Perspective

We invited other coaches to share their thoughts with us.  Marion Foreman is a personal trainer and fitness coach. We met her on Coaching for Excellence.

Marion writes: “Today we went for a walk, nothing odd about that – we do it a lot.  It’s a 5 mile circular route that we know well.  But today we walked it the other way round.  What a difference!

For starters the camber of the road was different so the feel was unusual.  Then the view was different – not just the big picture view, approaching the fields from a different angle gave us a new light on the trees, but the small view, the detail was different too.  We saw plants in gardens that we hadn’t seen before – they had been hidden behind a hedge that blocked our view when we walked round the other way.  I saw a house that I hadn’t seen before – incredibly it had been blocked from view before.

Next time I come across something so familiar I can do it with my eyes closed, I’m going to look at it differently and find the excitement in it again.  I am going to have a look and see if I am missing something.  And the next time a client tells me about something that they feel unable to change I am going to invite them to take a new look – I will invite them to stop looking from where they are and looking forwards and seeing the same issues, I will invite them to start from where they want to be and look backwards – they might just be able to see the same things in a different light.”

© 2012 3D Coaching Ltd
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3D Juggling 447: That Monday Morning Feeling

Claire writes: “In last Saturday’s Casualty on BBC1, the plot unfolded by different players telling their part of the same story. At work, how often do we tell the story for someone else through interpretation, assumption, presumption or simply for speed? The same facts can look completely different when told from different perspectives.

Last Sunday, I woke up in the night to hear Mike make a terrible noise, and saw him sit up and fall out of bed unconscious. Once I had established that he really was unconscious and not asleep, I dialled 999. Until we arrived at the hospital, he was still very incoherent and so I told the story of what I saw and heard to the ambulance crew and the medics. Once he came round and said he had cramp in his leg, it was a couple of hours while they made sure he hadn’t had a stroke. All the tests were fine and home and the cool light of morning revealed a large bump on his head. Recovered from the shock of the night’s events, he had remembered his side of the story. Woke up with awful cramp, sat up to stretch, fell out of bed and knocked himself out. Same facts. Different perspective. And far less serious although painful.

How can we empower people in our organisations to tell their own story?”

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd
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