Tag: community engagement

3D Juggling 576: Olympic Spirit

Su writes: “Up and down the country, people are turning out in herds to witness the Olympic Torch passing by where they live.  Where we were, people were 10 deep on the pavements, and on roundabouts, on verges, hanging out of balconies, on shoulders, on tiptoes.

There was a sense of thick excitement in the air, a great sense of community, warmth and good humour and oodles of suspense. When the moment came, cameras clicked and people cheered. And then the moment passed: in reality we had maybe 5 torch minutes and an hour of anticipation.

All those people came together for a common purpose: it was about being part of the Olympic spirit.

How does this relate to business? When we ask for commitment and engagement from our employees are we inspiring them at the right level? Are we connecting with them at the “Olympic spirit” level which gets them excited or the “standing in the rain with a group of noisy people” level which is realistic but dull?”

3D Juggling 554: Receiving

Claire writes: ‘For the second time in 3 years, we have had a leaky pipe and water damage at home.  This time two of us had to move out for a month and we are now left with no kitchen for the next few weeks at least.

We are learning so much.  People, mostly, are wonderful when we give them the chance to be! And to allow people to give, others need to receive.  How often in the community or at work do we settle into the role of giver or receiver?  And how often do we label others?

Being rather dependent on others for cooking meals for several weeks has been a wonderful experience of conversations.  And huge learning about the power relationships surrounding giving and receiving. Simon Walker writes that ‘Receiving involves placing yourself in someone’s debt and accepting with humility the service of another. It takes away your control and invites you to allow someone else to love you and have power over you.’

How often have you said ‘You can’t’ ‘You shouldn’t have’ ‘You mustn’t’ when someone gives to you.  I have – even though I first learned not to say that a very long time ago in Kenya when a very poor family gave me 4 eggs – which was all that they had. To have refused would have disempowered them.  And now the lesson has returned.  What a gift it can be to others when we receive thankfully and graciously – and allow others to have power.

So if you’re a giver who doesn’t like receiving or if you always say – I couldn’t possibly accept… what will you do differently this Christmas?

Think about it…”

 

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 512: Trust

Claire writes:  ‘After a family party last weekend, where one of the children’s wheelchair was stolen from the hotel, I decided to Tweet to see if anyone could help us look for it.  Little did we imagine what response we would get.  By Sunday afternoon @3dclaire was trending in the UK.  Someone’s husband walked round the local farmers market showing stall holders a photo of the chair to ask for help.  Other people put us in touch with the local media. Others offered supportive comments and offers of practical help.

We trusted that the wheelchair was safe – and someone broke that trust. People talk about random acts of kindness and equally we experienced random acts of generosity from people who trusted that this was a genuine request and not a scam. Trust goes a long way. And in a world of bad news stories, kindness stands out. What would it be like if we trusted more… and were willing to be generous to strangers? Think about it…

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

Doing more with less
There are often cutting comments in the press about the relationship between Cameron and Clegg, often speculating about the degree of trust between them.  The lack of trust saps energy, fosters a climate of suspicion, and replaces teamwork with internal politics.  If this feels familiar we recommend a book called The Speed of Trust by Stephen M R Covey.  Covey gets to the core roots of ethical behaviour and integrity and demonstrates how trust can speed everything up – surely critical in organisations where resources are being cut.  He offers a different approach to thinking about how to do more with less.

His first recommended behaviour is to ‘talk straight’. Be honest.  Tell the truth.  Let people know where you stand. Use simple language. Call things what they are.  Demonstrate integrity.

This is what we do when we coach.  You can learn how via our Coaching for Excellence programme.

3D Juggling 507: Looking carefully

Jane writes: “Last year I was visiting family and friends in Australia at Christmas and for the first time I didn’t put up any decorations in my house.  My friend, who considers the festive season to have truly arrived once she can see my tree lights sparkling from her window, expressed her disappointment.  This year I determined to make a show, and was looking forward to decorating my tree.  I carefully (so I thought) tested the tree lights before draping them over the branches and adding an uncoordinated array of baubles and silver foil bells made by the little people in my life.  Then I turned them on again and – you guessed – they didn’t work!

Actually that’s not strictly true.  The blue and green bulbs worked, but not the yellow and red ones.  I realised that when I’d checked them I’d just looked to see if they lit up – I took a quick glance, saw twinkling, and was satisfied.

This is a time of year for looking carefully – to see who might need our help to be able to enjoy the festivities without feeling lonely or overwhelmed, or maybe needs support and encouragement as they face uncertainty about their job.  Where could you be looking?  How could you help?

We should also look for opportunities to enjoy ourselves. I managed to disentangle the lights from my tree and they have been replaced by some new ones –along with some caramel filled chocolate bells. Mmmm!”

Discuss this week’s juggling at http://www.3dcoaching.blogspot.com/

© 2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 494: Community

Claire writes: “I’m trying out Twitter and received a Tweet this week that says:

World population rankings:
1: China
2: India
3: Facebook
4: USA
5: MySpace
6: Indonesia
7: Brazil
8: Twitter (via @mikamika59)

That was information. Other Twitter exchanges have included conversations – talking to a Canadian coach about her love of Redbush tea and meeting someone who does similar work to 3D in the States. But whatever people say, Twitter is not a community.  It’s only personal conversations that lead to relationships which build to form a real community. For me, social media is a way of sharing information and only a few of the people we encounter on the way will be people that we get to know.

Is there community where you work? Or are you a group of people who happen to travel daily to the same building? When the economy is hitting the workplace hard, it’s the organisations which have fostered community which have the greatest chance of survival.  It’s then that people stop thinking about ‘me and my needs’ and start thinking about the needs of the team… and it’s then a far shorter journey to consider the needs of our customers and therefore our organisation.

So community is about relationship and not population size.  What can you do this week to foster that where you work or live?”

Love this? If you need some help in your organisation to build community, come out for a cup of coffee with us to talk about how we can help you.  We’ll pay!2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

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3D Juggling 385: Happening

Claire writes: ‘Good things happen because people make them happen. Bad things happen because people let them happen.’ said Martin Bell at a recent talk about his work as a journalist and politician.

The man in the white suit is suggesting that activity leads to good things and passivity can lead to bad. It is a challeging summary of the reflection from Pastor Martin Niemoller, a victim of the Nazis:

First they came for the Jews
and I did not speak out
because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for the Communists
and I did not speak out
because I was not a Communist.
Then they came for the trade unionists
and I did not speak out
because I was not a trade unionist.
Then they came for me
and there was no one left
to speak out for me.

Active? Or passive?’

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who has stood up for you.

(c) 2008 3D Coaching Ltd