Tag: business development

3D Juggling 652: Balanced Scales

There are still a number of people coming forward for interview coaching.  If you know you will need support in the next few weeks, let us know soon so we can support you as we have holidays coming up! 

Claire writes: “When I was working with people who wanted to move into international aid and development roles overseas, we often talked about the need for balance between knowledge and skill and experience.  They’re most useful when they are balanced enough.

We often talk to people about their own professional development.  Some organisations don’t require this, and others make it mandatory.  It’s a useful way of continuing to keep an edge in the way we work, I think – even if we are challenged by things where we disagree and are caused to think.

A great way to balance our development is to consideriStock_000016468623XSmall

  • What is useful and interesting development for me personally?
  • What is useful for my organisation/ business?
  • What development am I doing this year that will add value to the people or organisations I work with?

If we’re a learning junkie, that can help us discern value – and if we’re not, it can challenge us as to whether no development is serving those with whom we work.

If things are quietening down over the summer, it might be a good time to think.”

All our training and teleclasses can be used as CPD for coaches.

© 2014 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com
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3D Juggling 610: Siloes

Claire writes: “I’m not sure where the term silo working comes from, but we hear it all the time – in all kinds of places.  You hear it in the NHS, in business, in the church and in almost any place where you have people responsible for parts.

I heard a great idea this week, attributed to Michael Langrish: You’re not wholly responsible for a part. You’re partly responsible for the whole.

What might that look like?”

© 2013 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com
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3D Juggling 542: Capacity to Defrag

Claire writes “In the post exam summer clear-out with the girls, my job was to speed up the computers by clearing out old files and defragging. Not a fast job when there was as much music and as many photos as I found. One machine took 12 hours ut the outcome was a beautiful line of blue and white. And a much faster experience. The other one was simply too full.

Windows gave up and we were still left with a disheartening solid block of red. And no improvement on speed, of course. To be able to clear themselves, the machines needed enough white space or unused disc space to be able to manoeuvre files.

We had left it too late.

Reorganising stuff, ideas or career change needs to happen while there is still enough time and space to think. Waiting until it’s absolutely essential may be too late. We replaced it. We can’t replace ourselves. Think about it…”

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 541: Who do you schmooze?

Jane writes: ‘You’ve identified all your stakeholders – all those people, volunteers and organisations that have an interest in your service, product, operations, impact, turnover/profit etc.  How do you know what sort of attention to give each of them?  Do you spend more time and effort with the ones who show most interest in what you’re doing, or those that provide you with most income?  Do you forget about the ones have been quiet for the last six months, or those that you are confident are supportive of your plans?

Tricky decisions, and there’s no right answer.  There are some general principles that you can follow though.  Don’t ignore any of them.  Don’t assume that because they are not showing much interest now that they won’t pop up and exert some influence later.  The best laid plans can be scuppered by a stakeholder whose interest wasn’t understood.

Understanding the differing degrees of interest and influence associated with stakeholders will help you to plan how to keep them involved; through keeping them informed, consulting with and involving them, maybe encouraging them to enthuse about what you’re doing to others.

Who do you need to schmooze?

© 2011 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely.  Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

We were recently talking to a former CEO of some houselhold name brands. He recommends the Balanced Scorecard as an approach to managing stakeholders.

3D Juggling 470: Lessons from my iPhone

Liz writes: “Whilst standing on a cold station platform waiting for a train to Leeds this week I noticed that the “slide to unlock” function on my iPhone won’t work if I’m wearing gloves.

Being the sort of reflective person I am I started wondering what message this might have for our business?

My phone wanted a personal touch, not a gloved approach and I reflected on how important being yourself is in coaching. Being transparent, saying what you see and tailoring your approach to the coachee is, I suggest, a powerful way to unlock potential.

Often what’s needed in coaching is a space for people to unlock their thinking and the best way I’ve found to do this is to really, really listen. Not so that I can ask the next clever question, not even so I can fully understand, but so that the coachee can believe that I am there for them, that I believe in them and that I trust they have the ability to find their way through the maze of their issue if I just let them.

When trying to unlock new business, a personal touch is also very effective. Rather than sending blanket emails I find it more effective, and enjoyable, to meet with people face to face, spend time talking to them about their challenges and discussing how I might be able to help. Working out how I can meet their needs rather than seeing where they fit into my offers.

So what are you trying to unlock at the moment and how might a personal touch work?”

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who loves their phone!

© 2010 3D Coaching Ltd
May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 431: The Sock Drawer

Claire writes: ‘Last time I travelled to my own office to work I was 8 months pregnant with a child who is now 5 foot 9! The next office was the bedroom in a small terraced house, and the desk was the chest of drawers. The only way to type was to rest the keyboard in the sock drawer! More recently, we’ve been in a purpose built home office. How have we grown 3D? Not by setting goals. For us, the way to develop is to have conversations that seem to be important and, from time to time, to come up for air and notice what’s going on. In fact, our decision to expand into new premises was the result of a conversation at our team awayday.

Some people are driven by goals and yet they demotivate others. David Megginson at Sheffield Hallam has dome some interesting research . For some, goals are like a carrot – something motivating and exciting to aim for. For others, they are like a stick – painful and punishing. What’s important is that we develop in a way that allows creativity and innovation to flourish.

Do goals work for you? If they don’t, what do you need in order to flourish and develop?’

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who hates goals!

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: http://www.3dcoaching.com/ and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 430: Market Trader

Claire writes: ‘We move into our new office next week. It’s in a Business Centre. We’re looking forward to getting to know the neighbours and I’m wondering what will be different about my working style on office days which are spent in the hub of a business centre and not the home office.

When are we doing a job? And when are we running a business? Is your approach to work like the team member in Tesco – it’s a job? Or like the market trader – it’s a business? Most organisations that we work in have an internal market now where work is commissioned and supplied almost on a tendering basis. If you don’t put in the best bid, someone else gets the work. If you don’t have a clear offering with clear returns on investment, someone else will get the work. This is a huge shift from the working style which you may be comfortable with. And it also has benefits for the business – people are clearer about what they do and how they will do it.

In an internal market, you also need to begin to sell yourself in a different way. In Creating you and Co, William Bridges recommends that we stop simply looking for jobs and start seeing ourselves as Me PLC by noticing the markets where our skills can be used in our workplace, creating that into a product that the business wants and then selling that internally in our organisation. If your job is under threat you can choose to sit and wait to discover whether the hatchet hits your post. Or you can start seeing what Me PLC brings to the market.

And if you hate your job, Me PLC has another benefit. Imagine that today is the first day of a new contract between Me PLC and your current employer. What else do you need to be doing now to develop Me PLC?’

Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who works in an organisation with internal markets!

© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: www.3dcoaching.com and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com

3D Juggling 429: 1930s Austin

Jane writes: “I was sorting through a box of papers left by my father when I found a garage chart for Austin 16 & 20 hp six cylinder models, circa 1930. It’s a beautiful chart and I’ve had it framed and display it in my kitchen. It has become a metaphor that helps me to understand the approach I often find myself taking when working in organisations. In the centre of the chart is a detailed diagram of an Austin car, showing all the components and how they intersect. At critical points there are symbols. The key to these symbols describes whether these points should be oiled or greased, and whether weekly or monthly. Some of them just need to be given ‘attention’.
Organisations are complex systems, with teams and individuals whose responsibilities and activities intersect. Sometimes they rub against each other and experience friction. It can be difficult to find the right kind of oil or grease, the type that will release tension and conflict to allow the system to work effectively and efficiently. Often the lubrication needed is a simple but brave conversation, maybe the result of finding a different way of presenting a point of view, or
stating a need.
How many different types of oil or grease can you draw on?”
Love this? Do us a favour and send it to five people. Who thinks like you? You could send it to someone who likes engines!
© 2009 3D Coaching Ltd May be distributed freely. Please retain contact details: http://www.3dcoaching.com/ and send a copy/ link to info@3dcoaching.com